Posts tagged “Wills”

If you make a gift to a young person in your Will which they receive when they reach a certain age you will create either a bereaved minor’s trust or a bereaved young person’s trust, depending on their age. 
 

A bereaved minor’s trust 

A bereaved minor’s trust is created if you make a gift in your Will to your children on the condition that they reach the age of 18. 
 
These trusts can only be created for your children or stepchildren. A grandparent, for example, can’t create this type of trust in their Will for their grandchildren. 
 
The following conditions must be met: 
at least one of the child’s parents must have died 
the trust must have been created by a parent’s Will, intestacy, or under the Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme 
the trust must meet inheritance tax (IHT) conditions so that the child becomes absolutely entitled to the trust assets no later than their 18th birthday and, before then, the child benefits from any capital growth and income generated. 
 
While the child is under 18, money generated by the trust can be saved or used for the child’s maintenance, education or other benefits. Trustees can therefore use any income and capital directly for the child or by paying the child’s surviving parent or guardian. 
black and gold pen and Last Will and Testament
There are reports that challenges to historic Wills have increased by up to 400% this year. 
 
In some cases, challenges are being made several years after an estate has been settled. 
 
People are enquiring about the possibility of challenging the Wills of friends and family members, believing they have a claim to money or assets, although they weren’t declared at the time. 
Some of the UK’s biggest banks, building societies and insurance companies are discussing how to improve services for bereaved customers. 
 
More than 60 organisations, including major banks, intermediaries and brokers are involved in creating a new Bereavement Standard. 
butterfly and orange flower
Did you know that a caveat can be used to prevent a grant of probate? 
 
What could this mean for your friends and family? 

What is a caveat? 

A caveat is used to ask someone to suspend an action. In the case of your Will, it could be used to stop your executors obtaining a grant of probate. If you don’t have a Will, it could be used to prevent your family obtaining letters of administration. 
Since the 1960s, owning an idyllic holiday or retirement villa in a beautiful corner of Spain has been a dream for many people. 
 
It’s estimated that 800,000 to 1 million homes in Spain are owned by British citizens, with over 380,000 living there full-time. 
 
Many British property owners in Spain are retirees with grown-up families. If this sounds like you or a family member it is important to give some thought to what should happen to property and assets in the UK and in Spain. 
Family members, most frequently parents, worry about how to provide for a relative who is, or who could become, vulnerable. 

Who is vulnerable? 

Of course, we could all become vulnerable at some point in our lives due to accident, illness, or changes in our circumstances. 
 
However, more generally someone could be described as vulnerable if they: 
aren’t educationally or emotionally mature for their age 
don’t understand how to manage their finances 
depend on ‘means tested’ benefits for their day to day needs because they are unable to work, for example. 
People are now more than ever realising that their affairs should be put in order. And with the situation as it currently is, there is a sharp rise in people suddenly jumping on the bandwagon and setting themselves up in their bedroom as Will Writers, offering cheap online Wills. So why should you choose someone like Angela Jane Will Writing over a online cheap will? 
We’re all learning to use technology in our daily lives, from banking, reading the news or looking for a dinner recipe but should you make an online Will? 
 
Here are some things you should know. 
Laptop with government website Wills page
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