Posts tagged “LPA”

People are now more than ever realising that their affairs should be put in order. And with the situation as it currently is, there is a sharp rise in people suddenly jumping on the bandwagon and setting themselves up in their bedroom as Will Writers, offering cheap online Wills. So why should you choose someone like Angela Jane Will Writing over a online cheap will? 
When people talk about ‘putting my affairs in order’, we often assume that they mean that they mean they’re ‘getting ready for death’. That doesn’t have to be the case. 
 
In fact, everyone who has assets should think about what will happen if they are unable to manage them – for any reason. 
 
Here are some helpful things you can do, to put your affairs in order. 
The good news is that number of people registering for lasting powers of attorney (LPAs) has increased by over 190% since 2013. 
 
However, research by Direct Line Life Insurance has highlighted that many people still assume that their loved ones can make decisions on their behalf, if they if they are unable to make decisions themselves. 
Up to a million people could be owed refunds on their Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) fees. 
 
Between 1 April 2013 and 31 March 2017, the Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) overcharged for LPA applications. 
 
A year ago the Ministry of Justice started to give refunds to people who had applied for LPAs between 2013 and 2017. 
 
Up to 1 February this year 194,713 claimants had received refunds of more than £12m. However, it’s estimated that 800,000 people could still be eligible to claim. 
There are two types of lasting power of attorney (LPA); one for your property and financial affairs, and one for your health and welfare. 
 
You can only put LPAs in place if you have capacity to appoint your attorney(s). 
 
If you haven’t put LPAs in place and lose capacity to make these decisions, then someone will need to apply to the Court of Protection for a deputyship order.  
 
This will allow them to manage your affairs, but you won’t be able to say who you want the Court to appoint. 
You won’t have the right to make decisions on your child’s behalf once he or she reaches the age of 18. 
 
If you are the parent of a child with a condition such as Asperger’s or Autism, for example, you will certainly be proud of all the things they can manage for themselves when they become an adult. However, there will probably also be things that they find very challenging, such as dealing with money or talking to medical professionals. 
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